UNTHSC Logo Catalog 2012-2013

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GSBS Course Descriptions

BMSC 5100. Application Workshops
1 SCH. Participation in three workshops is mandatory. These workshops are designed to help students improve their non-academic qualifications such as interviewing skills, application process, and writing essays. Offered each summer. Pass/No Pass Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5110. Evaluation and Instruction in Teaching
1 SCH. A distributed learning course designed to provide students with an overview of the teaching-learning process as it relates to the systematic design and assessment of instruction and student learning in graduate health professions education. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5120. Issues in Higher Professional Education
1 SCH. A distributed learning course designed to provide students with an overview of the institutional and leadership issues that create the environment for instruction and curricula implementation in graduate health professions education. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5121. Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues for Responsible Clinical Research
2 SCH. Regulations involved with human subject research will be discussed both from an historical and contemporary perspective. Case studies will be presented and students will attend an Institutional Review Board meeting. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-01-10
BMSC 5135. Introduction to Faculty Research Programs
1 SCH. This course is designed to introduce new graduate students to the research programs conducted by the faculty of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. It is also expected that this exposure will promote student-faculty interactions and introduce students to participation in oral scientific presentations and preparation of written reports and manuscripts. Offered each fall and spring. Pass/No Pass Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5140. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. Student will attend 15 lectures of current interest presented by invited speakers throughout the institution. Attendance is mandatory. May be repeated for credit. Offered each fall and spring. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5150. Laboratory Rotations
1 SCH. Designed to allow first-year graduate students an opportunity to work in a particular research laboratory on activities directed by the instructor in order to become acquainted with the research and laboratory environment before selecting a mentor. All students in the discipline of biomedical sciences are required to complete a minimum of two laboratory rotations (BMSC 5150). It is strongly recommended that students complete three laboratory rotations. The primary goal of rotations is to help a student choose a major professor. A secondary goal is to expose students to a number of areas of study to expand expertise and knowledge in research techniques. Each rotation is 6-10 weeks in length. Prerequisite: instructor consent. Offered each semester. Pass/No Pass Effective 2010-10-21
BMSC 5160. Biomedical Ethics
1 SCH. Covers major ethical issues in biomedical sciences, including: authorship and intellectual property; conflict of interest; data selection/research design; privacy and confidentiality; discrimination and sexual harassment; misconduct and whistle-blowing; animals in research; human subjects in research; implication of funding sources for research. Offered each Fall. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5165. Introduction to Industry Practices
1 SCH. Introduction to the practice of industry science with an emphasis on good laboratory practice, new drug applications, FDA regulations, clinical trials and biotechnology transfer. Course graded on pass/fail basis. Offered each Spring. Pass/No Pass Effective 2012-01-01
BMSC 5170. Techniques in Biomedical Sciences
1 SCH. A practical course in techniques. Students will participate in laboratories demonstrating up-to-date techniques in biomedical sciences. A listing of the techniques of participating laboratories is available in the schedule of classes. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5200. Introduction to Concepts in Biomedical Science
2 SCH. Course designed for undergraduate participants in the summer research programs with emphasis on data collection, analysis and presentation in the areas of physiology, pharmacology, microbiology, molecular biology, anatomy and cell biology. Offered each Summer. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5201. Clinical Practice Preceptorship
2 SCH. The goal of this course is to provide exposure to clinical practice conducted by osteopathic physicians and educational experiences within the private sector emphasizing the totality of community-based family practice. Students are required to find their own preceptor. This course is open only to students in the medical science discipline. Offered each Summer. Pass/No Pass Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5202. Tools for Teaching Science
2 SCH. Workshop format to prepare students to serve as resources and teachers in secondary schools. Offered each Summer. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5203. Regulation of Human Subject Research
2 SCH. Regulations, policies and procedures associated with the conduct of human subjects research will be presented both from historical and contemporary perspectives. Principles and practical aspects of research involving human subjects will be described, including operational training in protocol development. Case studies will be presented and relevant Institutional Review Board processes will be explored. Prerequisite: BMSC 5960 preferred. Offered each Fall and Spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5205. Topics in Biomedical Sciences
2 SCH. This course is an introduction to the core integrated biomedical sciences curriculum required for all first-year biomedical sciences graduate students at the health science center. It is not intended to be all-encompassing or comprehensive, but it does aim to provide the student with an overview of some seminal concepts in areas ranging from biochemistry to pharmacology and neuroscience. It will become apparent at the conclusion of the course, if not before, that division of biomedical science into traditional disciplines is no longer valid, because, as future scientists, students must become familiar with basic information that transcends all subjects. The goal of this course is to start the student on the path toward the integration of certain important concepts into his/her learning and understanding regardless of final choice of discipline. Offered each summer. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5220. Novel Macromolecules that Regulate the Cell Cycle
2 SCH. This course focuses on the cellular signaling pathways involved in endogenous active peptides interacting with their receptors. In particular, ocular peptides that may have a role in normal homeostatic function and pathophysiology of the eye are featured. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, BMSC 6303, BMSC 6304 and BMSC 6305 or consent from course instructor. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5230. Structure and Function of the Eukaryotic Chromosome
2 SCH. Current publications in the general area of chromosomal structure and function in mammalian cells will be discussed in the journal club format. Students are required to participate in the presentation and discussion of current articles related to chromatin structure, nucleosomes, histone proteins, metaphase chromosomes, telomeres, centromeres, nuclear matrix, nuclear pores, nucleolus, nuclear envelope, nuclear laminas, DNA replication, transcription, DNA damage and repair, ribonucleoprotein particles, splicesosomes, and macromolecular interactions in heterochromatin and euchromatin (interphase chromatin). Offered each Spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5231. Introduction to Health Disparities Issues in the United States
2 SCH. An examination of the disparities and issues surrounding the treatment of several health problems in the United States, particularly as related to minority populations. Each health condition is approached from the clinical, cultural and scientific aspect so that the student will understand the etiology and treatment of the disease, the cultural characteristics of various populations that may contribute to the disproportionate presence of the disorder in a particular population, and the underlying science involved with each health problem. The latter understanding will aid the student to better approach research, both in the clinical and basic science venues, directed towards better management of the health problems. Offered each Fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5250. Laboratory Management
2 SCH. This course will introduce students to the tools businesses use every day to increase efficiency, improve operations and succeed. These tools can be used in the laboratory to improve turn-around time, lower costs, introduce new testing services, and help to increase quality. There are no prerequisites for this course, however a financial calculator is strongly recommended. Offered each Fall and Spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5301. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 1: Principles of Biochemistry
3 SCH. This course is a broad introduction to the fundamentals of biochemistry, especially those relating to thermodynamics, molecular pathways and regulation. Discussion of important techniques that contribute to our present understanding of biochemistry. Course restricted to Medical Sciences and Clinical Research Management majors. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5302. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 2: Molecular Cell Biology
3 SCH. This course covers the fundamentals of cell and molecular biology, concentrating on understanding of the experimental basis of these disciplines as well as the current state of knowledge. Course restricted to Medical Sciences and Clinical Research Management majors. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5303. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 3: Immunology and Microbiology
2 SCH. A general exploration of basic concepts of immunology, microbiology and virology including study of genomics, proteomics and gene therapy. Course restricted to Medical Sciences and Clinical Research Management majors. Offered each Fall. Prerequisites: BMSC 5301 and 5302 or consent of the department. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5304. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 4: Physiology
5 SCH. Emphasis on integrative physiology of human organ systems. This course is restricted to Medical Sciences and Clinical Research Management majors. Prerequisites: BMSC 5301, BMSC 5302 or consent of the course instructor. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
BMSC 5305. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 5: Pharmacology
2 SCH. Emphasis on fundamental principles of pharmacology that include pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, ligand-receptor interactions and their consequent biological effects. Course restricted to Medical Sciences and Clinical Research Management majors. Prerequisites: BMSC 5301, 5302 or consent of the instructor. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5310. Scientific Communications
3 SCH. The purpose of this course is to develop skills and gain experience in the types of scientific writing required for: submitting articles for publication; grant applications; preparing presentations for lectures and seminars; preparing posters for meetings. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5312. Introduction to Clinical Research and Studies
3 SCH. Course covers drug development process, ethical and scientific principles of clinical research, clinical trial preparation, study design, informed consent forms, clinical coordinator responsibility and regulatory considerations. Conducting clinical trials from initiation to implementation. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5350. Principles of Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Medicine
3 SCH. This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental elements of epidemiology, with relevant emphasis on clinical applications and evidence-based medicine. The course consists of lectures, biomedical journal article discussions, student presentations, and other activities as assigned. Lectures emphasize the basic concepts of epidemiology and clinical research design, and their applications to clinical medicine and public health. Biomedical journal articles emphasize the practical application of concepts covered in lectures. Group presentations provide students an opportunity to enhance their communication skills, while also demonstrating mastery of course content. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For master's students capable of developing a finite problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For master's students capable of developing a finite problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-08
BMSC 5395. Thesis
3-6 SCH. To be scheduled only with consent of department. No credit assigned until thesis has been completed and filed with the graduate dean. Continuous enrollment required once work on thesis has begun. Prerequisite: Approved thesis research proposal. May be repeated for credit. Student will receive letter grade for final semester only. Offered each semester. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 5400. Biostatistics for Biomedical Sciences
4 SCH. Statistical methods and experimental design; descriptive statistics; data presentation; parametric and non-parametric methods of hypothesis testing including two-sample tests, analysis of variance, regression and correlation analyses; introduction to multivariate statistics. Competency with computer statistical packages is developed. Offered each summer. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5697. Internship Practicum
6 SCH. The candidate must complete an internship at an approved site. At the completion of the practicum, the student will write a report detailing the activities of the internship. A copy of the report must be submitted within the appropriate deadlines to the graduate school according to the guidelines for completing the requirements for graduation. Offered each semester. Student will receive letter grade for final semester only. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 5998. Individual Research for MS Students
1-12 SCH. Master's-level research of an independent nature. A maximum of 12 SCH will be allowed toward degree requirements. Offered each semester. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Effective 2009-08-01
BMSC 6301. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 1: Principles of Biochemistry
4 SCH. A broad introduction to the fundamentals of biochemistry, especially those relating to thermodynamics, molecular pathways and regulation. Discussion of important techniques that contribute to our present understanding of biochemistry. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BMSC 6302 or consent of the department. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 6302. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 2: Molecular Cell Biology
4 SCH. The fundamentals of cell and molecular biology, concentrating on understanding the experimental basis of these disciplines as well as the current state of knowledge. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BMSC 6301 or consent of the department. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 6303. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 3: Physiology
3 SCH. Emphasis on integrative physiology of human organ systems. Offered each spring. Prerequisite: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302 or consent of the department. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-09
BMSC 6304. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 4: Pharmacology
2 SCH. Emphasis on fundamental principles of pharmacology that include pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, ligand-receptor interactions and their consequent biological effects. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, or consent of the department. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 6305. Integrative Biomedical Sciences 5: Immunology and Microbiology
3 SCH. A general exploration of basic concepts of immunology, microbiology and virology including study of genomics, proteomics and gene therapy. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302 or consent of the department. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-09
BMSC 6310. Grant Writing
3 SCH. Demonstration of competence in the area of research chosen for the dissertation or a related topic as evidenced by writing, presenting and defending an NIH R21 grant application. Attendance at a series of grant writing workshops is required. Must be undertaken prior to the completion of 84 SCH. Prerequisite: Successful completion of BMSC 5135, 5160, 5310, 5400, 6301, 6302, 6303, 6304, 6305, and a discipline-based qualifying examination. Offered each semester. Pass/No Pass Effective 2011-10-07
BMSC 6390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For Doctoral students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 6391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For Doctoral students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
BMSC 6395. Doctoral Dissertation
3, 6 or 9 SCH. To be scheduled with consent of department. A maximum of 12 SCH allowed toward degree. No credit assigned until dissertation has been completed and filed with the graduate office. Doctoral students must maintain continuous enrollment in this course subsequent to passing qualifying examination for admission to candidacy. Prerequisite: approved dissertation research proposal. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Student will receive letter grade for final semester only. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Effective 2010-04-09
BMSC 6998. Individual Research
1-12 SCH. Doctoral research of independent nature. A maximum of 40 SCH will be allowed toward degree. Offered each semester. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Effective 2010-04-01
CBAN 5120. Visual Sciences Seminar
1 SCH. A monthly presentation by a visiting distinguished visual scientist. The seminar will be preceded by a journal check where articles relating to the seminar will be discussed. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 5140. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. Specialized weekly lectures on topics of current interest by students, faculty and/or invited speakers. May be repeated for credit. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 5200. Introduction to Bioinformatics
2 SCH. This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to and use of publically available bioinformatics websites and tools. The course is offered over an intensive 5 day period and will involve didactic instruction and problem solving laboratories. Students can bring specific bioinformatics questions and problems to be addressed in the class. Offered every Summer semester. Pass/No Pass Effective 2012-01-10
CBAN 5201. Bioimaging
2 SCH. The course will introduce students to various techniques atomic force microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence, histology, electron microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Lectures on theoretical principles will be accompanied with practical hands-on experiments. Offered each Spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-15
CBAN 5202. Introduction to Confocal Microscopy
1 SCH. Introduction to the optics, fluoresce, principles of measurement and analysis using the confocal microscope. Didactic lectures and practical use by the student are included. Offered every semester. Pass/No Pass Effective 2012-08-15
CBAN 5220. Current Topics in Visual Sciences
1 SCH. This course reviews and emphasizes current research in vision-related sciences. Students are required to participate in presentations and discussion of current articles. Faculty and research staff members may participate in presentations. Offered each Fall and Spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
CBAN 5300. Introduction to the Visual Sciences
3SCH. This course will cover the main topics in visual sciences including genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, pharmacology and pathology. There are no prerequisites. Course is offered every Fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-01-09
CBAN 5330. Structural and Developmental Anatomy of the Human Genitourinary System
3 SCH. Designed to familiarize the student with the development, gross and microscopic structures of the human genitourinary system. Lecture materials on the gross and histological morphology of the organs and structures associated with the human genitourinary system will be supported by detailed dissections of those structures in human cadavers. Completion of a mentor- directed research project utilizing knowledge of the genitourinary system and dissection skills acquired in the laboratory is required. This course requires prior approval from course instructor. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 5331. Basic and Clinical Histology
3 SCH. This course consists of lectures and laboratory sessions and will include presentations by students on current clinical correlations related to histology. This course is aimed at providing a basic working concept of human histology that can be used by the graduate student as a foundation for research and to encourage an appreciation for and comprehension of the clinical aspects of tissue and organ systems. Students will be expected to 1) understand the 3-dimensional orientation of tissues and the specific stains that are used to label cell components, and 2) examine tissue sections with the light microscope. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301 and 6302 plus two of the following: BMSC 6303, 6304, and 6305. Offered on demand. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
CBAN 5332. Structural and Developmental Anatomy of the Human Cardiorespiratory System
3 SCH. Designed to familiarize the student with the development and the gross and microscopic structures of the human cardiorespiratory system. Lecture materials on the gross and histological morphology of the human cardiovascular and respiratory organs and associated structures will be supported by detailed dissections of those structures in human cadavers. Completion of a mentor-directed research project utilizing knowledge of the cardiorespiratory system and dissection skills acquired in the laboratory is required. This course requires prior approval from course director. Offered each fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-06-22
CBAN 5334. Structural and Developmental Anatomy of the Human Digestive System
3 SCH. Designed to familiarize the student with the development and the gross and microscopic structures of the human digestive system. Lecture materials on the gross and histological morphology of the organs and structures associated with the human digestive system will be supported by detailed dissections of those structures in human cadavers. Completion of a mentor directed research project utilizing knowledge of the digestive system and dissection skills acquired in the laboratory is required. Requires prior approval from course director. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 5390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 5391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 5400. Structural Anatomy 1
4 SCH. A study of the gross morphological and histological structures of the human body (excluding those areas taught in CBAN 5630 and CBAN 6330). Lecture material and dissection in the gross anatomy laboratory are organized by systems. The course begins with study of the Musculoskeletal system, then followed by Head and Neck anatomy, and ends with the study of the Cardiopulmonary system. Students will explore the embryology, histology, and anatomy of these particular systems in full. Laboratory activities will require students to study the gross anatomy of the back, upper extremity, lower extremity, head and neck, and the heart and lungs. In addition, both lecture and laboratory sessions will emphasize clinical significance. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, 6302, plus two of the following: BMSC 6303, 6304 and 6305 or enrollment in the Medical Sciences discipline. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
CBAN 5401. Structural Anatomy 2
3 SCH. A study of the gross morphological and histological structures of the human body (excluding those areas taught in CBAN 5630 and CBAN 6330). Lecture material and dissection in the gross anatomy laboratory are organized by systems. The course begins with study of the Gastrointestinal system, then followed by the Urinary system, and ends with the study of the Reproductive systems. Students will explore the embryology, histology, and anatomy of these particular systems in full. Laboratory activities will require students to study the gross anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis, and perineum. In addition, both lecture and laboratory sessions will emphasize clinical significance. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, 6302, plus two of the following: BMSC 6303, 6304 and 6305 or enrollment in the Medical Sciences discipline. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
CBAN 5630. Structural Neuroscience
6 SCH. A complete study of the structure and function of the human nervous system utilizing basic principles of neuroanatomy, neurohistology, and neurophysiology. Laboratory activities will require students to participate in gross dissections of the brain and spinal cord. This integrated approach will provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the basic concepts of neuroscience. The course will consist of both lectures and labs related to the functioning of the normal and diseased nervous system. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, plus two of the following: BMSC 6303, BMSC 6304, and BMSC 6305. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 6141. Current Topics in Cell Biology and Anatomy
1 SCH. Contemporary topic chosen each semester from the broad areas of anatomy, cell biology and visual science. Format consists of presentations of current research articles by both faculty and students. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 6300. Scientific Writing
3 SCH. This course is designed to instruct graduate students in the basics of writing a scientific manuscript. The course will require that students have their own data for publication. Ethical issues in scientific writing will also be covered. Writing a grant application is not included in the course. Prerequisites: 3rd or 4th year standing for Ph.D. level students preparing to submit their first manuscript. Course is limited to 12 students. Offered every Fall semester. Pass/No Pass Effective 2012-01-09
CBAN 6320. Diseases of the Eye
3 SCH. Structure and function of the various ocular tissues, as well as the diseases which affect them. Lectures presented by basic scientists and clinical ophthalmologists. Offered in Spring semester (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2012-01-09
CBAN 6330. Structural and Developmental Anatomy of the Musculoskeletal/Skin System
3 SCH. This is a course designed to familiarize the student with the development, gross and microscopic structures of the human musculoskeletal/skin system. Lecture materials on the gross and histological morphology of human muscles and skin and associated bones, nerves, arteries, veins, ligaments and tendons will be supported by detailed dissections of those structures on human cadavers. Completion of a mentor-directed research project utilizing knowledge of musculoskeletal/skin system and dissection skills acquired in the laboratory is required. Requires prior approval from course director. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 6390. Special Problems in Cell Biology and Anatomy
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the faculty. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and the department chair. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 6391. Special Problems in Ocular Research
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the faculty in the areas of visual sciences. Problem chosen by the student with consent of the instructor and department chair. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 6430. Clinical Human Anatomy
4 SCH. An online (distributed learning) anatomy course offered through WebCT Vista. This course will have laboratories based on digital images taken from cadavers at the UNTHSC anatomy facilities. The course is divided into eight regions and topics covered will include the following: 1) back and suboccipital triangle; 2) upper extremity; 3) lower extremity; 4) head and neck I; 5) head and neck II; 6) thorax; 7) abdomen; and 8) pelvis and perineum. Clinically significant topics for each region will be addressed with an emphasis on the neurological feature of the particular manifestation. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
CBAN 6440. Methods in Molecular Biology
4 SCH. An intensive laboratory course designed to give students the expertise to perform basic techniques currently utilized in cell and molecular biology. Techniques will include plasmid preparation; isolation of cDNA inserts from various plasmids; extraction of nucleic acids; agarose gel electrophoresis; Northern and Southern blot analyses; cDNA cloning; sequencing and analysis; PCR amplification; protein gel electrophoresis; and immunoblot analysis. Prerequisite: BMSC 6301 and BMSC 6302.Offered each summer. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-11
FGEN 5095. Moot Court (Oral Qualifying Exam)
0 SCH. Students are required to provide testimony in a moot court setting and be tested on their knowledge and understanding of breadth and scope of forensic genetics. Offered each spring semester. Pass/No Pass grade. Pass/No Pass Effective 2010-07-15
FGEN 5101. Forensic Hair Analysis
1 SCH. Introduction to the microscopic analysis of hair for forensic evidence evaluation. Offered each fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-16
FGEN 5102. Blood Spatter Pattern Analysis
1 SCH. Introduction to the analysis of blood stain patterns for forensic evidence and crime scene evaluation. Offered each fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-16
FGEN 5103. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. This is a seminar course in which new and advanced methods in the genetic evaluation of biological forensic evidence will be discussed to expand the training of students in the Forensic Genetics program and students interested in clinical genetics. Topics to be discussed will include statistical analysis, microarray technology, bioinformatics, genomics and legal testimony. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
FGEN 5201. Overview of Forensic Sciences
3 SCH. The focus of this course is to familiarize the student with the scope of forensic science disciplines utilized in full service forensic laboratories. In addition to an introduction to the history and science behind biological evidence analysis prior to the PCR era, students will gain a detailed understanding of related fields of toxicology and drug analysis, instrumental analysis methods and analytical chemistry, and basis and techniques used in evaluating pattern evidence (e.g. fingerprints, tool marks, firearms, etc.). Offered each spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-16
FGEN 5202. The Application of Y-Chromosome Analysis in Forensic and Genealogical Investigations
2 SCH. This course is specifically designed as an elective for second-year students in the Forensic Genetics discipline. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the specialized field of Y chromosome analysis and its use in human molecular identity testing. Lecture material will include the following: biology, evolution and genetics of the Y chromosome, Y STR and Y SNP genetic markers, use of the Y chromosome in evolutionary, anthropological and forensic studies, statistical interpretation of Y-chromosome test results and validation of Y STR kits in forensic testing laboratories. The laboratory portion of this course will be concurrent with the laboratory portion of CBAN 5401. It will include the DNA extraction of mock case samples that would be appropriate for Y STR testing, PCR amplification, and genetic analysis of those samples using commercially available Y STR kits. Prerequisites: FGEN 5402, concurrent enrollment in FGEN 5400. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2011-08-21
FGEN 5300. Expert Testimony in Forensic Science
3 SCH. This course is intended to provide students with training in forensic testimony in the courtroom. Students will be required to provide testimony in a moot court setting. Discussions of admissibility standards, visual aids and trial preparation will be covered. Offered each fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-16
FGEN 5301. Population Genetics
3 SCH. Course topics will include the evaluation and characterization of genetic and phenotypic variation, population substructure, selection and random drift models, molecular processes of genetic change, quantitative genetics, and processes and modes of speciation, and organismal zoogeography. Offered every other odd year in the spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-18
FGEN 5302. Non-Human Forensic Genetics
1-3 SCH. Course content and methods discussed will concentrate on identification of biological evidence that is from non-human sources. Emphasis on biological methods for identifying and individualizing materials from vertebrate organisms of economic and environmental concern. Prerequisites: FGEN 5301. Offered every other summer semester (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
FGEN 5304. Forensic Anthropology
3 SCH. Human identification techniques with emphasis on identification from human skeletal remains. Fundamental biology of osseous and dental tissues; forensic botany and entomology; genetics of human variability; serotyping; HLA typing; analysis of hair and dermatoglyphic lines; DNA fingerprinting. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
FGEN 5305. Introduction to Molecular Laboratory Methods
3 SCH. This course is designed to give beginning graduate students experience and expertise in fundamental techniques used in many life science research laboratories. The course includes: simple solution and reagent preparation, laboratory calculations, microscopy, biomolecule quantification, DNA extraction, electrophoresis, enzymatic digestion, basic cloning procedures and an introduction to bioinformatic tools. The laboratory is also designed to train the incoming graduate student in proper laboratory safety, record keeping, and laboratory quality assurance and control methods. Offered every fall. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-18
FGEN 5306. Basic Methods in Forensic/Molecular Genetics
3 SCH. This is an intensive laboratory course designed to give students experience in the basic molecular techniques currently utilized by DNA testing laboratories. Methods include DNA extraction techniques, DNA quantification and other applications of Real-Time PCR, PCR amplification and fragment analysis utilizing capillary electrophoresis. Training will give the student a deep understanding of the science and development of each method so the student can train individuals in these methods and independently monitor and troubleshoot another person's work. The laboratory portion will not only give the students hands on experience with a variety of techniques following approved protocols, but it will also train the student in proper note taking and laboratory QA/QC. Prerequisite: FGEN 5305 or instructor approval. Offered every spring. Letter Grade. Letter Grade Effective 2010-10-26
FGEN 5307. Advanced Methods in Forensic/Molecular Genetics
4 SCH. This course is designed to provide students in-depth experience and expertise in performing DNA analysis techniques commonly used in forensic and molecular laboratories, as well as introducing future technologies. The targeted areas to be covered are real-time quantitative PCR, robotics, and detection and analyses of short tandem repeats (STR's) and mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The course objective is to give the student the fundamental tools to understand the scientific basis, detailed biochemistry, and current analytical methods for each technique. The course will not only give the students hands-on experience, but will also train the student in data analysis, expert systems, quality assurance, quality control and forensic case file management. Prerequisites: FGEN 5305 and 5306 or instructor approval. Offered every summer. Letter Grade. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-18
FGEN 5390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. This course is for master's students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
FGEN 5391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. This course is for master's students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
FGEN 5400. Biological Evidence Evaluation
4 SCH. Course topics include collection and preservation of biological evidence, chain of custody, evidence screening for biological components (blood, seminal fluid, saliva, hairs, etc.), presumptive and confirmatory testing, and an overview of historical testing procedures. Training will also include crime scene investigation and processing, Y-STR and mock case analysis. Prerequisites: FGEN 5400 and concurrent enrollment in FGEN 5402. Offered each fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-18
FGEN 5401. Forensic Genetic Data Analysis
3 SCH. Methodological approaches to evaluating genetic data for population analysis and genetic evaluation of various identity testing marker systems. Emphasis is on the statistical evaluation of microsatellite DNA, mitochondrial DNA, and SNP panels as applied to forensic DNA evaluation. Several approaches and software packages will be utilized for processing diploid and haploid genetic data sets. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302 & BMSC 5400. Offered each fall semester Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-18
FGEN 5402. Methods in Forensic Molecular Biology
4 SCH. An intensive laboratory course designed to give students experience and expertise in the basic molecular biology techniques currently utilized in forensic DNA analysis. Techniques will include multiple methods of extraction of nucleic acids from various sources; DNA quantitation methods; design and process of PCR amplification; agarose gel electrophoresis; capillary electrophoresis theory and methods; analysis of microsattelite DNA; mitochondrial DNA sequencing and analysis; single nucleotide polymorphism analysis methods. Offered each summer. Letter Grade Effective 2011-08-21
FGEN 6301. Human Genetics
3 SCH. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the role of human genetics in medicine and to introduce students to the databases that have resulted from the human genome project. Topics to be discussed include: the chromosomal basis for heredity; tools for studying the patterns of single gene inheritance; molecular and biochemical basis for genetic disease; organization and instability of the human genome; human genetic biogeography; common genetic diseases; and genetics of complex diseases. Offered every other spring semester (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
FGEN 6302. Advanced Microbial Genetics
3 SCH. This course covers the major aspects of prokaryotic DNA replication and its control, transcription and translation, regulation of prokaryotic gene expression, mutation, horizontal gene transfer, the genetics and replication of bacteriophage, global regulatory schemes, and some prokaryotic bioinformatics. Prerequisites include: microbiology and biochemistry. Knowledge of prokaryotic cell structure, the usage of the genetic code, and the structure of amino acids, DNA, RNA, and proteins is essential. BMSC 6305 is recommended. Cross-listed as MOLB 6302. Course offered during the spring semester, odd years. Letter Grade Effective 2010-02-05
FGEN 6303. Statistical Genetics
3 SCH. In this course, the students will explore the basic premises of underlying statistical models for genetic data and be able to understand how genetic variation can be interpreted in terms of probability models. Students will learn the principles of conducting quantitative analyses of date for determining 1) when to infer positive family history is regarded as a risk factor for disease; 2) how to proceed with establishing genetics as a significant risk factor; 3) mode of inheritance; and 4) localization of genes underlining a familial trait. The concept of interactions of genetic and environmental /life style risk factors and the methods to detect such effects will also be addressed. Stress will be placed on concepts and assumptions and their implications for finding genes for diseases, localization of disease-susceptibility genes, and estimation of genetic risks. Also emphasized in this course will be the application of statistics in societal problems where genetic principles may be useful. Prerequisites: calculus and statistics. Offered in the spring semester, odd years. Letter Grade Effective 2010-08-22
FGEN 6340. Molecular Evolutionary Genetics
3 SCH. The analysis of DNA and/or protein sequences at the gene, population, and species level has become a powerful tool for studying molecular evolution and understanding the effects of genetic change. Statistical and computational methods to effectively evaluate and interpret the data obtained from molecular level investigations have become more involved. The goal of this course is to introduce appropriate theory and methods needed to effectively analyze nucleotide and protein sequence data. Topics covered will include: measurement of sequence divergence, models of evolution, various approaches to phylogenetic evaluation and tree construction, statistical tests for detection of selection and evolutionary rates, inference of ancestral amino acid sequences, and the evolutionary significance of genetic polymorphism. Emphasis is given to practical methods of data analysis using multiple software packages designed to appropriately evaluate genetic data. Recommended Prerequisites: BMSC 5400 or equivalent, FGEN 5301. Offered every other fall semester (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2011-11-18
FGEN 6390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-03-23
FGEN 6391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2010-03-23
MOLB 5120. Current Topics in Immunology
1 SCH. Journal Club format consists of presentations of current research articles in the various areas of immunology by faculty, research staff and students. May be repeated for credit. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
MOLB 5121. Seminar in Cell Motility
1 SCH. Review of the current literature in muscle contraction, ciliary movement, microfilaments and actin-binding proteins, microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins, intermediate filaments, non-muscle motility, the organization of the cytoskeleton and the novel biochemical and biophysical techniques. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 5140. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. This course consists of specialized weekly lectures on topics of current interest by students, faculty, and/or invited speakers. May be repeated for credit. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 5150. Introduction to Flow Cytometry
1 SCH. This course will focus on the basics and practical applications of flow cytometry. Lectures, invited seminars, discussions as well as hands on training will be utilized in order to expose students to the different uses and applications of flow cytometry. Furthermore, students will be trained on instrument usage, as well as data acquisition, analysis and interpretation. Course will be limited to a maximum of 10 students. May be repeated for credit. Offered each Summer semester. Grading basis is Pass/No Pass. Pass/No Pass Effective 2012-01-10
MOLB 5160. Current Topics in Cancer Biology
1 SCH. Course reviews and emphasizes current research articles in cancer-related fields including apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and metastasis. Students are required to participate in presentation and discussion of current articles. Faculty and research staff members may participate in presentations. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 5201. Introductory Biochemistry
2 SCH. This introductory course in biochemistry is intended to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a foundation and in depth knowledge of biochemistry. This course will cover many aspects of biochemistry, including: biomolecules and metabolism. Offered each summer. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
MOLB 5210. Signal Transduction
2 SCH. Current publications in the general area of receptor-signal transduction will be discussed in the journal club format. Students are required to participate in presentation and discussion of current articles. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Offered each fall and spring. Pass/No Pass Effective 2010-04-01
MOLB 5220. Enzyme Regulation & Mechanism
2 SCH. Current topics in the areas of Enzyme Mechanism and Regulation will be discussed, based on student and faculty presentations of literature articles. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 5240. Advanced Lipoprotein Metabolism
2 SCH. Presentation and discussion of recent research findings and literature reports in lipoprotein metabolism and related areas. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 5390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 5391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 6201. Immune Responses Against Pathogenic Microorganisms
2 SCH. This course will focus on how the immune system responds to infection with pathogenic microorganisms. Microbial pathogenesis will be discussed, as well as the ensuing innate and adaptive immune responses generated against the particular pathogen. In addition to faculty lectures, discussions focused on recent articles will enhance the students' knowledge regarding immunity to infections. The course will involve student-led discussions of different infectious pathogens that will broaden the scope of the course and provide the students the opportunity to gain teaching experience. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, 6302, and 6305. Offered every other fall (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
MOLB 6202. Advanced Molecular Biology: Techniques and Principle
2 SCH. This course focuses on modern molecular biology techniques and their background/theory. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301and BMSC 6302. Offered every other Fall (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
MOLB 6220. Cellular and Molecular Fluorescence
2 SCH. Basic and advanced topics of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy of biological objects. Students attend lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301 and BMSC 6302. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 6230. Structure & Function of Proteins
2 SCH. Topics will include the isolation of proteins from tissue, their structural and functional characterization, effects of natural and synthetic mutants on the structure, stability and function of proteins. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 6240. Molecular Biology of Lipid Transport
2 SCH. Steroid-mediated regulation of gene expression, molecular function of lipoproteins. Emphasis on discussion of assigned readings and student presentations of literature articles. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, BMSC 6303, and BMSC 6305. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 6250. Molecular and Cell Biology of Cancer
2 SCH. Emphasis on cancer; initiation, promotion and progression apoptosis/caspases, angiogenesis, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, adhesion molecules; tumor immunology and metastasis. Course format will consist of brief lecture, discussion of assigned readings, and student presentations of literature articles. Prerequisites: BMSC 6302 or consent from the instructor. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 6270. Drug Discovery and Design
2 SCH. Introduction to combinatorial chemistry, multi-compound based technologies, and their use in screening bioassays to discover lead compounds. Concepts of design and synthesis of compound libraries, pharmacological assay development, instrumentation, data interpretation, biological target selection, lead optimization, structure-based drug design and drug-likeness will be discussed. Prerequisite: Undergraduate general and organic chemistry or equivalent (instructor approved.) Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
MOLB 6302. Advanced Microbial Genetics
3 SCH. This course covers the major aspects of prokaryotic DNA replication and its control, transcription and translation, regulation of prokaryotic gene expression, mutation, horizontal gene transfer, the genetics and replication of bacteriophage, global regulatory schemes, and some prokaryotic bioinformatics. Prerequisites include: microbiology and biochemistry. Knowledge of prokaryotic cell structure, the usage of the genetic code, and the structure of amino acids, DNA, RNA, and proteins is essential. Course offered during the spring semester, odd years. Letter Grade Effective 2010-08-22
MOLB 6350. Clinical Immunology
3 SCH. The purpose of this course is to first review and update student to various facets of basic immunology and introduce the topics in clinical immunology. Furthermore, the students should become aware of newest approaches to study immune function and ongoing innovative research. The class is heavily student driven and encourages "active learning" of the material, including searching in recent literature. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301,6302 and 6305 or equivalent with instructor's approval. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
MOLB 6360. Advanced Biophysical and Biochemical Methods
3 SCH. Progress in biomedical sciences requires multidisciplinary approach and depends on sophisticated instruments and methods that rely on advanced physical and chemical principles. Covered key subjects are: macromolecules, biomolecules, biophysical methods (including x-ray and crystallography, diffraction and scattering, magnetic resonance, spectroscopy and fluorescence) biochemical methods (chromatography, electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, proteomics, lipidomics, and metabolomics). Prerequisites: BMSC 6301. Offered during the spring semester, odd years. Letter Grade Effective 2010-08-22
MOLB 6361. Biomedical Mass Spectrometry
1-2 SCH. Course addresses biochemical methods, qualitative and quantitative bioanalysis, drug discovery and development, biotechnology, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics and forensics. Special attention will be given to skeletal muscle. Prerequisite: BMSC 6301. Course offered in the spring semester, odd years. Letter Grade Effective 2010-08-22
MOLB 6435. Molecular Aspects of Cell Signaling
4 SCH. Advanced study of signal transduction events from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Topics include; receptor activation, the generation of second messengers, kinases and phosphatases, cell-cell and cell-matrix communication, and transcriptional regulation. The course format will consist of lectures, discussion of assigned readings, and presentation of literature articles and participation of relevant seminars. Prerequisites: BMSC 6302 or consent of the instructor. Offered every other fall (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
ORTH 6100. Anatomy of Orthopaedic Surgical Approaches
1 SCH. Students will participate in anatomy review and surgical approach anatomy session for JPS residents given in the UNT anatomy laboratory. Sessions are held every other week from February to June 7-8 AM. Each graduate student will participate in several dissections preparations and in all anatomy laboratory sessions. They will also present a 1 hour lecture/discussion of topic covered in the dissections once a month. They will be graded on laboratory participation and on the quality of their presentations. Pre-requisite: CBAN 6630 MSS System; CBAN 5630 Structural Neuroscience; CBAN 5333 Cardiopulmonary System; CBAN 5334 Digestive System; CBAN 5330 Genitourinary System. Letter Grade Effective 2009-12-01
ORTH 6101. Anatomic Topics in Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery
1 SCH. Students will attend orthopedic Clinical Intergrated Lectures given to first year medical students (course #MSS 6630) given by orthopedic department (5 sets of lectures, 12 hours). They will have a 1 hour discussion on each topic. They will be graded by written examination over CIL lectures and on quality of discussions. Pre-requisite: CBAN 6330 Structural Anatomy of the Musculoskeletal/Skin System (may be concurrent enrollment). Letter Grade Effective 2009-12-01
OSMM 5140. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. Topics are selected for in-depth study by the student's major professor and graduate advisor. Topics may cover clinical, mechanistic, and educational aspects of manual/manipulative and musculoskeletal medicine in human and animal models. Students are expected to complete a concept or literature review paper on the topics. May be repeated for credit. Offered fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
OSMM 5141. Clinical Research Colloquium
1 SCH. This colloquium course will explore the practical issues of clinical research, review of journal articles and is presented in a seminar format. Speakers will include UNTHSC faculty, invited guests, and student participants. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
OSMM 5310. Introduction to Osteopathic Research and Studies
3 SCH. This course is intended to introduce the student to clinical research project design, institutional procedures for review and approval of research involving human subjects, ethical principles of clinical research, and proper implementation and conduct of clinical trials. Prerequisite: BMSC 5160. Offered fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
OSMM 5390. Special Problems in Clinical Research
3 SCH. Students will conduct research of an individualized problem under the direction and supervision of a graduate faculty mentor. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
OSMM 5391. Special Problems in Clinical Education
3 SCH. Students will develop educational materials and lectures under the direction and supervision of a graduate faculty mentor. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
OSMM 6100. Current Topics in Musculoskeletal Medicine
1 SCH. Topics are selected by the student's major professor and graduate advisor. Topics include; basic science, clinical research and education aspects of manual/manipulative and musculoskeletal medicine in human and animal models. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5100. Intracellular Calcium Signaling
1 SCH. This course is intended for senior graduate students and will cover recent advances in physiology, anatomy, cell biology and molecular biology relevant to intracellular calcium signaling. By the completion of the course, students will have a working knowledge of current areas of interest in research into intracellular calcium signaling. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5140. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. Specialized weekly lectures on topics of current interest by students, faculty and/or invited speakers. May be repeated for credit. Offered fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5300. Neurobiology of Aging
3 SCH. This course will serve as an introduction to the aging nervous system and age-related nervous system diseases. The course will include lectures by experts in the field of neurobiology of aging and discussion of selected topics in the field. By the completion of the course, the student should have a working knowledge of major issues that drive research in the neurobiology of aging. Prerequisites: BMSC 5301, BMSC 5302, BMSC 5303, and BMSC 5305. Offered every other spring (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5350. Introduction to Toxicology
3 SCH. The interrelationships of natural and synthetic agents to biologic systems are compared with the resulting toxicological response of the organism. Identification of causative agents and determination of limits of detection and safety are discussed. The principles of instrumentation methods and their use in a toxicological laboratory are described. Offered on demand. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5360. Experimental Toxicology
3 SCH. Lecture and laboratory experience emphasizes adverse reactions to chemicals and drugs, environmental hazards and analytical techniques for detection of foreign substances in biological fluids and tissues. Includes qualitative and quantitative laboratories, identification of causative agents and metabolic studies of toxic agents. Visits to professional laboratories specializing in toxicology are included. Offered on demand. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 5470. Neuropharmacology
4 SCH. In-depth presentations on: 1) mechanisms of neurotransmitter synthesis, storage and release; 2) mechanisms of neuropharmacological agents; 3) molecular and behavioral aspects of Alzheimer's and aging; and 4) drugs and neurodegenerative diseases. Prerequisites: BMSC 5301, BMSC 5302, BMSC 5303, and BMSC 5305. Offered every other spring (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6100. Botanical Medicines and Biotechnology
1 SCH. This advanced course will focus on the use of chemicals isolated from plants and other natural sources for medicinal purposes. A primary goal of the course is to integrate basic research and clinical/industrial findings. Each lecture, following the historical introduction will focus on a specific aspect of natural products research: identification of botanicals, isolation and characterization of chemical components, methods of testing, industry regulations and market barriers and uses. A college level knowledge of basic biology, chemistry, physiology and pharmacology is recommended. The format of the course will be a formal lecture for the first half hour followed by an information discussion for the last half hour. Participation in class discussion is an essential part of the course. Reading assignments will vary from week to week but can include textbook chapters, review articles, journal articles, and seminal or current peer-reviewed research reports. Offered on demand. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6140. Current Topics in Pharmacology
1 SCH. Review of current topics in pharmacology including pharmacology of aging, ocular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology and new drugs on the horizon. Offered each fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2010-04-01
PHRM 6200. Mitochondria and Complex Diseases
2 SCH. Lecture Topics: basic mitochondrial genetics, bioenergetics, and biogenesis; the Warburg Phenomenon and other metabolic alternations of cancer cells; mitochondrial control of apoptosis and cancer; mitochondrial ROS in cancer, mitochondrial genetic alternation in cancer; known mitochondrial diseases; laboratory techniques used in mitochondrial research. Workshop and laboratory: mitochondrial function assays; mitochondrial genetic assays to include quantification and mutation detection. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, 6302, 6303, 6304, 6305 or permission of the instructor. Offered every Fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-15
PHRM 6320. Advances in Molecular Pharmacology
3 SCH. An in-depth review of the current literature on modern pharmacology and signal transduction of drug receptors. Oral reports and written reviews required. Offered on demand. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6330. Advances in Behavioral Pharmacology
3 SCH. Directed, in-depth study of current research literature with an emphasis on behavioral pharmacology. Oral reports and written reviews required. Prerequisite: PHRM 5470. Offered every other spring (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6340. Psychiatric Disorders: From Bench to Bedside (Including Substance Use)
3 SCH. This advanced course will focus on the neurological basis of psychiatric disorders. A primary goal of the course is to integrate basic research and clinical findings. All disorders will be discussed at the molecular, cellular, systems and behavioral levels. Each lecture, following the introduction, will focus on a specific neuropsychiatric disorder, including Schizophrenia, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism, Tourette's Syndrome, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Unipolar Depression and Bipolar Disorder. Other lecture specific topics may include various forms of substance use/abuse (e.g., nicotine, alcohol, cocaine/methamphetamine, hallucinogens and marijuana). A college level knowledge of basic chemistry, cell physiology and anatomy is required. The format of the course will be a formal lecture followed by an informal discussion. Participation in class discussion is essential. Offered every other spring (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6350. Ocular Pharmacology
3 SCH. Review of pharmacological principles and therapeutic approaches regarding ocular diseases and eye organ systems. Offered in Spring semester (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2012-01-09
PHRM 6360. The Nuclear Receptor Superfamily: Core Principles and Relevance to Physiology and Disease
3 SCH. Members of the Nuclear Receptor Superfamily play a role in a vast array of physiologic processes. Originally discovered as steroid hormone receptors, they are now known to be receptors for such diverse ligands as thyroid hormone and vitamin D. A large number of receptors regulate transcription in the absence of binding hormone, as well, serving as targets of other signaling mechanisms. The course provides an overview of this extensive field. It will include lectures and discussion of structure/functional analysis, mechanisms of action, and examples of diseases associated with nuclear receptor dysfunction. Prerequisites: The GSBS core curriculum. Course is offered in the fall semester, even years. Letter Grade Effective 2010-08-22
PHRM 6400. Functional Neuroscience
4 SCH. This course is intended for second year and more senior graduate students, and will cover all major areas of neuroscience research. By the completion of the course, students will have a working knowledge of all major disciplines of neuroscience providing the basis for advanced courses. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6410. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology
4 SCH. This course presents and introduction to major drugs used for the treatment and prevention of disease. The course begins with an overview of the general principles of pharmacology, including major concepts of pharmacodynamics (drug action) and pharmacokinetics (drug time course, dosing.) The remainder of the course examines the major classes of drugs that modify the functioning of the autonomic, cardiovascular, central nervous, hematopoietic, and endocrine systems; antibiotics and NSAIDs are also covered. Emphasis is placed on the therapeutic use and mechanism of action of major drugs by class. The format of the course is student self-directed study supported by interactive sessions with faculty. Cross listed as PSYC 6411. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PHRM 6480. Receptors and Drug Action
4 SCH. This is an in-depth course of drug receptor pharmacology and receptor classes. Emphasis on techniques for studying receptor function, second messenger signaling and molecular pharmacology. Offered every other spring (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 5140. Seminar in Current Topics
1 SCH. Specialized weekly lectures on topics of current interest by students, faculty and/or invited speakers. May be repeated for credit. Offered fall and spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 5141. Current Topics in Ion Channels
1 SCH. Offered every Spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-01-09
PSIO 5300. Cardiovascular Physiology
3 SCH. Designed to familiarize the student with current concepts in human cardiovascular function with an emphasis on the heart and circulation. Topics include hemodynamics and regional circulations, neural control of the heart and circulation, cardiac electrophysiology, molecular basis of myocardial contraction, myocardial metabolism & ischemia, and cardiac failure. Course format includes lectures and discussion of assigned material, student presentations, and examinations. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, BMSC 6303, and BMSC 6305. Offered every other fall semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
PSIO 5302. Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Renal & Respiratory Systems
3 SCH. Focused examination of current preclinical and clinical research in the renal and respiratory systems. Examples of specific topics include: renal tubular transport mechanisms and their regulation, integrated renal and respiratory responses to acid-base disorders; mechanisms of inflammation-induced renal and pulmonary dysfunction; impact of exercise training on pulmonary function and its neural control. Course format includes lectures, student presentations of assigned reading drawn from the current literature. Grades will be assigned based on class participation, performance on mid-term and final examinations, and an NIH-style grant application relevant to the renal and/or respiratory systems. Course offered every Spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 5304. Molecular Genetics of Cardiac & Vascular Disease
3 SCH. Advanced in-depth study of the molecular biology and genetics of both normal and disease state cardiovascular functions. Emphasis is to be placed on the genetics behind disease state etiologies. A thorough review of all new genetic and molecular techniques developed to explore disease state physiology will be presented. Course format includes: lectures, student presentations, term paper, and examinations. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, BMSC 6303, and BMSC 6305. Offered every other spring (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 5390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 5391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 6310. Functional Genomics and Proteomics
3 SCH. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to concepts and methods used in defining a database of tissue specific and disease specific protein expression. Topics to be discussed include: 1) genome mining; 2) transcriptome mining and validation; 3) proteome mining by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and protein chips; 4) protein structure determination; 5) protein structure prediction based on gene sequence; 6) protein function prediction and analysis; 7) protein-protein interactions; and 8) protein localization. Cross-listed with CBAN 6341. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 6320. Advances in Cardiovascular Physiology 1
3 SCH. Directed, in-depth study of current research literature with emphasis on the heart. Oral reports and written reviews are required. Prerequisite: PSIO 5300. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 6330. Advances in Cardiovascular Physiology 2
3 SCH. Directed, in-depth study of current research literature with emphasis on the peripheral circulation. Oral reports and written reviews are required. Prerequisite: PSIO 5301. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 6350. Integrative Physiology of Skeletal Muscle
3 SCH. This course will provide an in depth examination of the fundamental physiology of neuromuscular function, current pre-clinical and clinical research into the skeletal muscle's metabolic and hormonal role in combating the metabolic syndrome; Type II diabetes and inflammation. Examples of specific topics include: Skeletal muscle structure and its neuromuscular junction; electrophysiology and neuromuscular transmission, metabolic responses to acute exercise; contraction and adaptation to acute exercise; exercise training induced myoplastic and metabolic adaptations; exercise training and its neural control of the circulation; fatigue and disuse atrophy; skeletal muscle as an endocrine organ and its involvement in Type II diabetes. Offered each Spring semester. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
PSIO 6360. Cardiovascular Regulation During Exercise
3 SCH. The course will provide an integrative physiological basis of blood pressure regulation during exercise. The mechanisms to be discussed include "Central Command" and the "exercising muscle pressor reflex" and their integration with basic hemodynamic responses to exercise. Course format includes lectures, student presentations, term paper, and examinations. Offered every other summer (even years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-05-01
PSIO 6370. Advanced Endocrine Physiology
3 SCH. An interactive survey of modern endocrinology presented largely from the current primary literature. The scope will focus on mechanisms and will extend from molecular biology (hormone interactions with genes, receptors, ion channels, second messengers, etc.) to systematic control (feedback, secretion, distribution, metabolic clearance rate, etc.) Broad topic areas discussed will be determined in part by class interests. Offered every other fall (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 6380. Neurohumoral Control of Autonomic Function
3 SCH. This course considers mechanisms for nervous system regulation of cardiovascular function with special consideration of current developments in integration of function. Prerequisites: GSBS core courses and permission of the instructor. Letter Grade Effective 2012-08-01
PSIO 6385. Current Topics in Physiology
1-3 SCH. Survey of literature, oral presentations and written reports. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSIO 6390. Myocardial Metabolism: Concepts and Controversies
3 SCH. Comprehensive survey of current scientific issues related to heart muscle metabolism and function. Specific topics include: control of myocardial substrate metabolism and fuel selection; ATP synthesis, intracellular transport and utilization; myocardial ischemiareperfusion injury; cardiac stunning and hibernation; mechanisms of cardiac cell death and cardioprotection; free radical biochemistry in the heart. Course format includes lectures, student presentations, term paper, and examinations. Prerequisites: BMSC 6301, BMSC 6302, BMSC 6303, and BMSC 6305. Offered every other spring (odd years). Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6380. Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine
3 SCH. An in-depth examination of current issues and research in cardiovascular behavioral medicine, emphasizing cardiovascular measurement, research methods, individual differences and biobehavioral perspectives on the pathophysiology, assessment and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6720 or consent of department. Offered each spring. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6390. Special Problems
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6391. Special Problems 2
1-3 SCH. For students capable of developing a problem independently through conferences and activities directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with the consent of the instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6396. Health Psychology Preceptorship 1
3 SCH. Practical experience that will focus on the integration of the health psychologist with the primary care physician, where the health psychologist functions as an important member of the primary care team in a manner that overcomes managed care barriers to this integration. The goal is for the student-doctor to achieve an advanced degree of competence in skills, knowledge, judgment, and ethics that will allow for the development of a greater understanding and identification with the role of the professional clinical health psychologist. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6397. Health Psychology Preceptorship 2
3 SCH. Practical experience that will focus on the integration of the health psychologist with the primary care physician, where the health psychologist functions as an important member of the primary care team in a manner that overcomes managed care barriers to this integration. The goal is for the student-doctor to achieve an advanced degree of competence in skills, knowledge, judgment, and ethics that will allow for the development of a greater understanding and identification with the role of the professional clinical health psychologist. Pass/No Pass Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6410. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology
4 SCH. Medical Pharmacology is a course designed for graduate students in the biomedical sciences and presents an introduction to major drugs used for the treatment and prevention of disease. The course begins with an overview of the general principles of pharmacology, including major concepts of pharmacodynamics (drug action) and pharmacokinetics (drug time course, dosing). The remainder of the course examines the major classes of drugs that modify the functioning of the autonomic, cardiovascular, central nervous, hematopoietic, and endocrine systems; antibiotics and NSAIDs are also covered. Emphasis is placed on the therapeutic use and mechanism of action of major drugs by class. The format of the course is student self-directed study supported by interactive sessions with faculty. Cross-listed with PHRM 6410. Offered each fall. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01
PSYC 6498. Psychology Research Seminar and Practicum
4 SCH. This course will focus on the initiation, conduct, and consummation of advanced research projects, as well as dialogues related to the art and practice of publishing. The purpose of the practicum is twofold: to engender an appreciation for scholarship and to engage students in research projects that have a high probability of resulting in journal publications. Prerequisite(s): doctoral standing in psychology. May be repeated for credit. Offered each semester. Letter Grade Effective 2009-08-01

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