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Posted: January 30, 2009

UNT Health Science Center researchers discover eating less may not increase life expectancy


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Dr. Michael Forster of the UNT Health Science Center and Dr. Raj Sohal of the University of Southern California's School of Pharmacy have discovered that eating less may not be a key to living longer. Their study and others by Health Science Center researchers were recently published in several scientific journals and articles.

The Forster-Sohal study found that lean mice that ate fewer calories did not lengthen their lifespan - a dietary factor which may be true for humans as well. Caloric restriction was beneficial to obese mice in the study, however. The study was funded by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. Results from the study were published in The Journal of Nutrition, Scientific American, Asian News International, Medical News Today, Science Daily and ScienceBlog.com, among others.

Dr. Peter Raven published a study that yields new information about blood pressure in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. The overview of historical experiments studies regulation of arterial blood pressure during exercise. Results from the study were published in Life Science Weekly, Blood Weekly, Biotech Week and others.

Dr. Adnan Dibas published his findings on enzyme research, particularly related to glaucoma, in the journal Molecular Vision. The study found that modifying  a protein may eventually lead to axon degeneration in glaucoma. Results from the study were also published in Proteomics Weekly.

Dr. Shigehiko Ogoh found that a combination of cerebral autoregulation and the autonomic nervous system work together to regulate cerebral blood flow during exercise. The results of his study were published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Science Letter, Life Science Weekly and other publications.

Drs. Abha Sharma, Rajendra Sharma, Pankaj Chaudhary, Sanjay Awasthi and Yogesh Awasthi, all with the UNT Health Science Center, along with researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, shed new light on the understanding of disintegration of cells in a study published in the Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Health & Medicine Week, Biotech Business Week and others.

The Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technologies partnered with the Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, and the Institute of Physics at the Marie Curie-Sklodowska University to study activity in cardiac contractile fibrils of skeletal muscle using fluorescence. They found the lifetime of a fluorescent marker was high in the presence of actin, a component of muscle plasma important to muscle contraction.  The marker's lifetime was low when they were dissociated from it. Findings were published by the American Chemical Society News Service.

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